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Boletín de mayo de 2021

En el último Boletín para Padres de Familia de la Escuela Secundaria, exploramos la importancia de seguir supervisando y hablar con su hijo sobre el no consumo de alcohol. Consulte la sección sobre grupos positivos de los que pueden formar parte en el instituto.

May 2021 Newsletter

In the latest Middle School Parent Newsletter, we explore the importance in continuing to monitor and have the conversation with your teen about not using alcohol. Check out the section on positive groups that they can be a part of in high school.

Boletín de marzo de 2021

En este número de The Parent Post – edición de la Escuela Intermedia, exploramos la importancia de monitorear y desarrollar estrategias familiares para mantener a su adolescente a salvo del consumo de alcohol entre menores.

March 2021 Newsletter

In this issue of the Parent Post, Middle School Edition, we explore the importance of monitoring and developing family strategies to keep your teen safe from underage drinking.

Boletín de enero de 2021

Monitorear y establecer expectativas claras

En este número de The Parent Post – edición de la Escuela Intermedia, exploramos la importancia de monitorear y comunicar expectativas claras a nuestros hijos adolescentes cuando se trata de hablar acerca de no consumir alcohol. También resaltamos la importancia de los recursos de salud mental para los adolescentes y proporcionamos una emocionante actualización acerca de la NUEVA campaña de “vapeo” en los jóvenes de la escuela intermedia.

January 2021 Newsletter

Monitoring & Setting Clear Expectations

In this issue of the Parent Post – Middle School edition, we are exploring the importance of monitoring and communicating clear expectations with our teens when it comes to talking about not using alcohol. We also highlight important mental health resources for teens and provide an exciting update about the NEW middle school youth vaping campaign!

Boletín Noviembre 2020

Siga hablando, manténgalos saludables

Es importante seguir hablando para mantener a los adolescentes saludables. En este tomo de The Parent Post, exploramos los riesgos de beber alcohol siendo menor de edad. También compartimos formas en las que puede comunicarse de forma productiva con su hijo adolescente sobre el no consumo de alcohol. ¡Asegúrese de revisar el enlace a Guía de Recursos en esta edición para obtener recursos de salud mental y abuso de sustancias para adolescentes!

November 2020 Newsletter

Keep Talking – Keep Them Healthy
It is important to keep talking in order to keep your teen healthy. In this issue of The Parent Post, we explore the risks of underage drinking. We also share ways you can productively communicate with your teen about not using alcohol. Be sure to check out the Resource Guide linked in this edition for mental health and substance use resources for teens!

Septiembre de 2020: Creando vínculos sólidos – Siga hablando

En el primer número de Parent Post – Edición de la Escuela Intermedia: Estamos emocionados por otro año escolar con la campaña Poder de Elección (Power of Choice). ¡En este número hablaremos acerca del tema de este año, compartiremos herramientas, consejos e información para ayudarlos a seguir hablando con sus hijos acerca de los riesgos del consumo de alcohol y otras sustancias, y compartiremos con ustedes lo que ha estado haciendo el Equipo de Prevención para sus hijos!

September 2020: Building Strong Bonds – Keep Talking

In the first issue of the Parent Post – Middle School edition: We are excited for another school year with the Power of Choice campaign! In this issue we will talk about this year’s theme, share tools, tips and information to aid you in continuing to talk with your children about the risks of alcohol and substance use, and share with you what the Prevention Team has been up to for your students!

 

Keep Monitoring – It is an Act of Love

It is important for parents to explore the idea of monitoring and communicating clear expectations with your teens when it comes to talking about not using alcohol. Monitoring looks like many things. While in some instances it means looking for when things are amiss, other times it is looking for opportunities to support our teens growth and development.

Keep Talking and Keep them Healthy

In this issue we are looking at the effects and risks of underage drinking and what we can do to help prevent underage drinking. It is important for parents to be informed on these issues in order to help our teens make informed decisions.

Monitor & Set Clear Expectations with Your Teen about Not Using Alcohol and Other Drugs

In this issue we are exploring the importance of monitoring and communicating clear expectations with our teens when it comes to talking about not using alcohol. While parent-child conversations about not drinking are essential, talking isn’t enough – we also need to take concrete action to help our children resist alcohol. Research strongly shows that active, supportive involvement by parents and guardians can help teens avoid underage drinking and prevent later alcohol misuse.

Monitor, Talk & Build Strong Bonds – Talk with Our Teens About the Risks of Underage Alcohol Use

Parents can have a major impact on the children’s decision to drink alcohol or not, especially during the preteen and early teen years. The best way to influence our children to avoid drinking is to have a strong, trusting relationship with them. Research shows that teens are much more likely to delay drinking when they feel they have a close, supportive tie with a parent or guardian.

Keep Talking, They’re Really Listening

Parents are the most influential protective factor in their Children’s lives. What parents say really DOES matter and your children really ARE listening. Especially when it comes to the vital topic of not using drugs and alcohol. While peer pressure is something to keep in mind, helping your child prepare themselves on how to handle situations with friends is best done together. Use our peer pressure zine activity to get you started.

Keep Talking and Monitoring – Know the Risk Factors that Could Influence Underage Alcohol Use

In this issue we further develop on the conversation about the importance of monitoring and talking with your teens about the consequences of underage alcohol use. It is important that parents are not only informing their youth, but also themselves about the risk factors that could lead their teens toward the unhealthy decision to use alcohol. We explore this as well as ways parents can continue to be the strongest influence on their teens’ decision to make the healthy choice to not use alcohol, tobacco and other drugs..

Keep Monitoring – Help Teens Choose to Not Use Alcohol

It is important to continue the conversation about the monitoring and communicating with your teens about the consequences of underage alcohol use. Kids are curious, they know alcohol exists and it is up to parents to ensure students understand how alcohol can negatively impact their development and goals in life. Monitoring looks like many things. While in some instances it means looking for when things are amiss, other times it is looking for opportunities to support your teen’s growth and development. It is just as important to support your child when things are going right, so that they are aware that you notice and respond, as it is when things are not going as smoothly.

Monitoring & Developing Family Strategies to Keep Your Teen Safe from Alcohol

It is important to not only monitor, but also work with your teen to develop family strategies to keep them safe from underage drinking. Early adolescence is a time of immense and often very confusing changes for your teen, which makes it a challenging time for both your child and you. Staying connected with your teen and letting them know you are aware as well as understanding what it is like to be a teen can help you be close to your child. This in turn can ensure you have a positive influence on the choices that he or she makes – including the choice not to drink alcohol.

Monitoring & Setting Clear Expectations

It is important for parents to explore the idea of monitoring and communicating clear expectations with your teens when it comes to talking about not using alcohol. Find tips to help guide you to set clear expectations with your teen.

PowerTalk for Families

Our Family Can Have a Positive Influence

May’s Power Talk is all about being a positive influence. It’s a perfect time to talk about this as a family now. Adolescents who take active steps to contribute, gain a sense of purpose that will motivate them and prepare them to succeed. As we develop the skills of resilience in our families, we can think about the unique talents that our family can contribute to the world and find ways to develop and use those talents. This is especially true during these challenging times. Each family has the power to become a positive influence!

Moving Toward Independence

April showers bring May Flowers! Spend your rainy day gathered with the family on the couch to talk about moving towards independence using April’s Power Talk. Adolescence is a time for exploring individuality. It’s natural for your adolescent to seek independence and their own identity. Giving adolescents age-appropriate freedom builds independence and confidence and can actually encourage a healthier connection between them and their parents as they grow into confident, productive young adults. Keep Talking, They Are Listening – the more your family talks together, the easier it is to talk about not using alcohol. 

Our Family Copes Strong

Stop and take a mindful moment with the family using March’s Power Talk about Stress. We hear that word a lot. Usually we talk about stress as it affects an individual. But families also have stress they experience as a collective unit. Life changes such as death, divorce, sibling conflict, relocation or illness affect all members of a family. The level of impact that stressor has on the family is based on the resources they have for dealing with the event. If a family has developed appropriate resources, they will see life changes as challenges to be met. If not, they may view a stressor as uncontrollable.

Family Character Check-in

Take a moment to gather the family on the couch and settle in for a family chat using February’s PowerTalk for Families. This month’s PowerTalk is about character. Character traits are those that help us to be cooperative, productive members of our families and our community. Positive character traits help us to respect ourselves and others. Character makes each of us a better person “on the inside,” which affects us as individuals, but it also impacts our families. Keep Talking, They Are Listening – the more your family talks together, the easier it is to talk about not using alcohol.

Our Family Story

Connection is important for all humans; it gives us an essential sense of belonging. As adolescents mature and become more independent, it may seem like they really don’t need (or want) connection to family.

Knowledge is Power

Grab a couple blankets, gather the family on the couch and settle in for a family chat using December’s PowerTalk for Families. This month’s PowerTalk is about competence. Competence means having the necessary ability, knowledge or skills to do something successfully. No person is competent at everything. Sometimes, you can become competent by working hard, learning skills and practicing. We should always try to be OUR best, but we are not always going to be THE best.

Our Family Portrait

Grab a snack, a healthy drink and settle in for a family chat using this PowerTalk. This year, the theme for the Power of Choice is “I CAN.” We will be looking to develop and build resilience in our students as individuals and in their families. Resilience is the ability of an individual to overcome challenges of all kinds–trauma, tragedy, personal crises, ordinary life problems–and bounce back stronger, wiser, and more personally powerful. You can use the skills you already have and find ways to use those skills more intentionally. Start this year of “I CAN” family activities with a picture of your family.

Qualities of a True Friend

Adolescents’ decisions are often influenced by their peers. Unhealthy friendships can leave them vulnerable to risk taking and dangerous situations. Teens say their parents are often their most reliable source. In this edition, learn tips to help teach youth to recognize the qualities of true friendship. These qualities can empower them to choose healthier friendships and strengthen the skills that will help them to stay alcohol free. Talking about friendships/relationships can make easier to also talk about not using alcohol.

The Power of Positive Peer Influence

Peer behavior, both positive and negative, has a powerful influence on adolescent decision-making. When adolescents associate with positive social peers, they are more likely to engage in healthy behaviors and make responsible decisions. Talking about friendships/ relationships in general makes it easier to also talk about not using alcohol and the impact that underage drinking could have. Learn tips to help you talk with your teen about being a positive peer influence and making the healthy decision to not use alcohol.

Healthy Family Strategies

Healthy adolescents make healthy choices. The first step to a healthy future is having a healthy NOW. Research shows that adolescents that have a healthy lifestyle are less impulsive, less anxious, get better grades, have greater self-control and are more likely to make the healthy choices that will lead to a drug and alcohol-free future.  Learn tips to get you talking about health in general, which in turn will make it easier to also talk about things like not using alcohol.

Strategies for Dealing with Stress

Our children have lots of stressors in their lives—school, grades, sports, friends, technology, lack of sleep. Unmanaged stress can be overwhelming and lead to anxiety-related illnesses. Taking the time to talk with and teach adolescents healthy ways to manage stress helps them to become emotionally healthy individuals. Emotionally healthy individuals are less likely to use alcohol as a coping tool. Talking about stress can make it easier to also talk about not using alcohol. Keep talking – they really are listening.  Find tips to get you talking about dealing with stress in a healthy way.

Freaky Friday! Switch Roles With Your Parent

Research shows that resilient individuals report the presence of caring adults in their lives. Helping adolescents recognize, understand and appreciate those caring adults will help to build those resiliency skills. At times, parents and their adolescent children face conflict because they each feel misunderstood or underappreciated by the other. Use this PowerTalk for Families, to help switch roles with your teen to gain a better perspective. This will make it easier to discuss the negative effects of alcohol, and what that means in terms of mental and physical health, safety and making healthy decisions.

Trusted Adults are Valuable

Developmental research shows that having one or more caring adults in a child’s life increases the likelihood that they will flourish and become productive adults themselves. In many cases, these caring adults are the child’s parents, but other relatives, neighbors, friends of parents, teachers, coaches, religious leaders, and others can play this role. Caring adults, like these, can provide another perspective and offer guidance and support. Having another adult in your world to not only support your child, but also you can help make it easier to discuss the negative impacts of alcohol with your teen.

Family Talent Night

Each of us is an important part of our community. We each have talents and strengths that make us unique. We each use those talents and strengths to make a difference in our family, our school and our community. An important part of building resilience in our children is helping them to recognize their own strengths and determine how they can use them to make a difference in their world. Remind your child that you are there for support and guidance – and that it’s important to you that she or he is healthy and happy and makes safe choices. This can help make it easier to talk about tough subjects like not using alcohol.

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